Amager Fælled

By Peter Petersen

 

This is a male Orange-Tip Butterfly (Anthocharis cardamines cardamines) or Aurora sommerfugl in Danish. Females are similar but without the orange.  

The area called Amager Fælled is a green paradise in the middle of the city of Copenhagen. This is one of only a few places near/in copenhagen that the public can visit and enjoy native flora and fauna. The place is "The lung of the Danish capital".

This photo article contains only a small fraction of the flora and fauna which live in Amager Fælled. The biodiversity here is extremely high.

March

The Great Tit (Parus major) is called Musvit in Danish. This species is very common in Denmark and will stay all year.

The Great Tit  (Parus major) can produce 12 eggs in one batch.

This European Peacock Butterfly (Aglais io) has survived the winter. This species is called: Dagpåfugleøje sommerfugl in Danish.

After waiting patiencely at this nest I discovered that it belonged to Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus). A species called: Spurvehøg in Danish.

The male Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) guarding the nest.

The Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) normally breeds in May in Denmark (in my experience). But this pair started in March.

The stripes/pattern of the Eurasian Sparrowhawk (Accipiter nisus) makes it perfectly camouflaged for a life in the trees.

Looking closely at the Eurasian Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) from behind you will see the stripes in the wings which can confuse predators during an attack.

April

I spotted this pair of European Toads (Bufo bufo) the 1st of April in amplexus. This species is called: Skrubtudse in Danish. Like all other amphibians in Denmark, this species is protected and may not be harmed or collected.

The Common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) is called: Tårnfalk in Danish.

The Common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) breeds in this area.

Common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) belong to the falcon family (Falconidae)

The Tawny Mining Bee (Andrena fulva) is called: Rødpelset jordbi in Danish. This species is a solitary bee, so every female is actually a queen.

The Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) is called: Skovhornugle in Danish.

The Long-eared Owl (Asio otus) breeds in this area. This small area seem to have at least 6 specimens.

The European Peacock Butterfly (Aglais io) has "eyes" on its wings to scare off predators.

When the European Peacock Butterfly (Aglais io) folds its wings together it looks like a dry leaf.

The Eurasian Oystercatcher (Haematopus ostralegus) are also present here. This shorebird have a wingspan of 80-85 cm.

The Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata) is a regular guest in Grønjordssøen a shallow pond in the area. This species is called: Skeand in Danish.

The specialized bill Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata) is used to forage for aquatic invertebrates and plant food. This species seem shy and is difficult to get close to. Photos above is males.

A female Northern Shoveler (Spatula clypeata) skimming the surface-water for crustaceans and plankton.

Little Grebe (Tachybaptus ruficollis) or Lille Lappedykker as it is called in Denmark is the smallest European member of its family (Podicipedidae). Only 23-29 cm with a weight of approxemately 170 grams.

In the other end of the scale we have here the national bird of Denmark. The Mute Swan (Cygnus olor) in Danish called: Knopsvane. This species is the heaviest bird species here with a weight of 10-12 kilos.

The Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) feeding on fresh leaves.

The Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) is called Skovskade in Danish.

The Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) is called: Fuglekonge in Denmark. This bird species is almost exclusively insectivorous, feeding on small arthropods like springtails, aphids and spiders. Here they seem to feed on ticks as well.

The Goldcrest (Regulus regulus) is Europes smallest bird with a lenght of only 8.5–9.5 cm and a weight of 4.5–7 grams

The Common Wood-Pigeon (Columba palumbus) is called: Ringdue and sometimes: Skovdue in Danish.

Cyanistes caeruleus) is feeding on pollen. This species is called: Blåmejse in Denmark.

A male Eurasian Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla) singing to attract females.

Another songbird here is the Marsh Warbler (Acrocephalus palustris). This species is called: Kærsanger in Danish.

The Western Marsh-Harrier (Circus aeruginosus) is one of the birds of prey that feeds in this area. This species is called: Rørhøg in Danish.

The Common Drone Fly (Eristalis tenax) is an important pollinator of the early flowering trees in this region. This species is called Droneflue in Danish.

The Common Drone Fly (Eristalis tenax) can stand completely still in the middle air but also move extremely fast when escaping predators. It is almost impossible to follow with your eyes but fortunately this one decided to rest of a leaf.

The average wingspan of a Common Drone Fly (Eristalis tenax) is around 15 mm. 

The Ring-necked Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) is called: Fasan in Danish. This is a male.

This is the Great Cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo). This species feed on fish like roach and perch in the small ponds here. This bird is called: Skarv in Denmark.

A male Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) or Gråand as it is called in Danish. This is the most common duck in Denmark.

The male Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) in full view. 

A female Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)

European Comma (Polygonia c-album) is called: "Det hvide C sommerfugl" in Danish. This species is relatively rare in Denmark but is found in this area.

This is the Long-tailed Tit (Aegithalos caudatus) called: Halemejse in Danish.

The Eurasian Jackdaw (Coloeus monedula) formerly known as Corvus monedula is a very common species in Denmark. This species is called: Allike in Denmark. 

Another common species here is the Eurasian Magpie (Pica pica). This bird species is called: Skade in Danish.

The Greylag Goose (Anser anser) is feeding on grass. This species is called Grågås in Danish.

A Eurasian Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) enjoying the last sun of the day. A species called: Blåmejse in Danish.

This Eurasian Blue Tit (Cyanistes caeruleus) is feeding on insects and buds. 

The Colt's-Foot (Tussilago farfara) is called: Følfod in Danish. This flower is a sign of Spring. This is one of the first spring flowers.

The Western Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) is called: Rådyr in Danish.

The Western Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus) is living in this small area in the middle of Copenhagen.

The Grass Snake (Natrix natrix) is the only snake species in this area. This species is called: Snog in Denmark.

The Grass Snake (Natrix natrix) out of hibernation in April. To my knowledge this is the only reptile in this area.

The Green Sandpiper (Tringa ochropus) is called: Svaleklire in Danish. This is one of only a few species of wader present in Amager Fælled.

The Grey Heron (Ardea cinerea) is the most common heron in Denmark. This species is called: Fiskehejre in Danish. They feed mostly on fish and amphibians.

The Common Pochard (Aythya ferina) is called: Taffeland in Danish. This is a female from Grønjordssøen a wedland in the area. This species is regarded as VU (Vulnerable) by the IUCN.

This is a male Common Pochard (Aythya ferina) from the same lake.

A closely related species is the Tufted Duck (Aythya fuligula) or Troldand as it is called in Denmark.

The Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) is another species I have come across here. This species is called: Hvinand in Danish. Above is a male.

This male Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula) is acting up to get the females attention.

This is the female Common Goldeneye (Bucephala clangula). 

Greenish Warbler (Phylloscopus trochiloides) is called: Lundsanger in Danish. The Warblers have an amazing song which you normally can hear from April. 

The Willow Warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus) is also present in this area. It is called: Løvsanger in Danish. The warblers seem to feed mainly on small insects.

The Green-veined White Butterfly (Pieris napi) is called: Grønåret kålsommerfugl in Danish. The plant here is the edible Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata) which is called: Løgkarse in Denmark.

The Green-veined White Butterfly (Pieris napi) is very similar to a female Orange-Tip Butterfly (Anthocharis cardamines cardamines). But a large difference is that the Pieris napi is white under the wings as you can see here in flight.

A close up of the Green-veined White Butterfly (Pieris napi).

As the name suggests the Common Flesh Fly's (Sarcophaga carnaria) larvae feeds on carrion. The species is called: Almindelig kødflue in Danish.

Common European Yellowjacket (Vespula vulgaris) also known as a common wasp. In Danish the species is called: Almindelig Gedehams and commonly: Hveps. 

Eurasian Blackcap (Sylvia atricapilla). It is called: Munk in Danish. This bird seem to feed mainly on insects and spiders. 

Natures diversity is simply amazing. Areas like this is crucial for bio diversity.

The Common Greenbottle Fly (Lucilia sericata) is actually used for maggot therapy. Larval secretions have been shown to help in tissue regeneration in humans.

The Common Greenbottle Fly (Lucilia sericata) is called: Grøn spyflue in Danish. 

The abdomen of the Humped Orbweb Spider (Gibbaranea gibbosa) has a scary smiley face on the back. Probably to scare off predators.

The three dimensional shape of the Humped Orbweb Spider's (Gibbaranea gibbosa) back makes the face visible from many angles.

The Humped Orbweb Spider (Gibbaranea gibbosa) belong to the Orbweaver family (Araneidae). These have 4 eyes forming a square in the middle of their face and two eyes barely visible on the each side of the square.

This female Humped Orbweb Spider (Gibbaranea gibbosa) has made an egg sac of her strong silken thread and natural materials found near by.

The female Humped Orbweb Spider (Gibbaranea gibbosa) will often turn her back (the face) towards the assumed predator. In this case me the photographer. 

This stick is actually the tool my friend Linett used to guide the Humped Orbweb Spider (Gibbaranea gibbosa) during the photo session but this female spider was eager to move on to the new "branch".

May

In may many insects appear. This is the Wasp Beetle (Clytus arietis) This species is called: Lille Hvepsebuk in Danish.

The Wasp Beetle (Clytus arietis) mimics the wasp to scare of predators. 

The European Nursery Web Spider (Pisaura mirabilis) is called: Almindelig rovedderkop in Denmark. 

Speckled Wood (Pararge aegeria tircis) is called: Skovrandøje in Danish. 

The Mottled Dingy-brown Click Beetle (Agrypnus murinus) is called: Musegrå Smælder in Danish. This species can make a clicking move which can scare off predators and get this beetle back on its legs again. 

The 10-Spot Ladybird (Adalia decempunctata) is called: Tiplettet mariehøne in Danish.

The 10-Spot Ladybird (Adalia decempunctata) can actually have between 0 and 15 spots. This species is highly variable.

The Fourteen-spotted Lady Beetle (Propylea quatuordecimpunctata) is called Skakbræt-mariehøne in Danish. You can find more than 50 species of ladybird/lady beetles in Denmark.

The Fourteen-spotted Lady Beetle (Propylea quatuordecimpunctata) usually have 14 black, almost rectangular spots.

A mating pair of Cabbage Bug (Eurydema oleracea). This species is called: Almindelig kåltæge in Denmark. This female will lay 60-80 eggs over the next 4-6 weeks.

This is a species of Slender Crab Spiders (Tibellus species). This genus is called: Slanke krabbe-edderkopper in Danish.

The Swamp Crab Spider (Xysticus ulmi) is called: sumpkrabbe-edderkop in Denmark. This male is around 4 mm. 

The same Swamp Crab Spider (Xysticus ulmi) in a lateral view. The forest-like habitat is my arm.

This is a female Swamp Crab Spider (Xysticus ulmi). The female can grow up to 8 mm.

This one belong to the Longlegged Sac Spiders (Cheiracanthium species). In Danish these are called: Pighånd Edderkop.

The blue coloration of this Longlegged Sac Spiders (Cheiracanthium species) is a sign that it has just moulted.

This is one of the most colorfull specimens of Longlegged Sac Spider (Cheiracanthium species) that I have found in Amager Fælled.

The Bishop's Mitre Shield Bug (Aelia acuminata) is called: Almindelig Bispetæge in Danish. This species feeds on grass and fresh grass seeds.

The Bishop's Mitre Shield Bug (Aelia acuminata) seem to grow to around 8-10 mm.

The caterpillar of the Drinker Moth (Euthrix potatoria). This species is called: Græsspinder in Danish.

The Drinker Moth (Euthrix potatoria) can vary in color pattern.

The Iris weevil (Lixus iridis) is relatively rare in Denmark with less than 300 observations since 1986. This species is called: Iris-snudebille in Danish.

This Iris weevil (Lixus iridis) pair is mating.

The Iris weevil (Lixus iridis) is around 17 mm long.

The violet black-legged robber fly (Dioctria atricapilla) is called: Sort Engrovflue. This up to 12-millimeter long insect has a wingspan of around 9 mm. It is a predatory insect that feeds mainly on smaller flies.

The Bordered Shieldbug (Legnotus limbosus) is called: Hvidrandet tornben in Danish. This species is relatively rare in Denmark with a little over 300 observations since 1993.

A closely related species is The Forget-me-not Shieldbug (Sehirus luctuosus). This species is called: Mørk tornben in Danish. This species is also relatively rare in Denmark with only around 150 observations since 1978. 

 

Illiger's Carrion Beetle (Silpha tristis) is called: Kornet Ådselbille in Danish.

Illiger's Carrion Beetle (Silpha tristis) grows to around 16 mm and feed on carrion, but can also hunt snails, worms and insects.

The Common Blue Damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) is called: Almindelig vandnymfe in Danish. This species can reach 35 mm. This is a female.

The female Common Blue Damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) is more pale in color.

The male Common Blue Damselfly (Enallagma cyathigerum) is bright blue.

The Sloe Bug (Dolycoris baccarum) is called: Almindelig bærtæge in Denmark. This species is very common.

The Sloe Bug (Dolycoris baccarum) sucks juice on many different plants like raspberries and blackberries.

The Dark Sailor Beetle (Cantharis fusca) is called: Stor Blødvinge in Danish. This specimen is feeding on a larva found inside a grass straw.

The Crescent Piercer (Grapholita orobana) is a moth. This species is called: Vikkevikler in Danish.

Thye larva of the Mottled Umber (Erannis defoliaria). This moth is called: Stor Frostmåler in Denmark.

This is the larva of the Common Carpet Moth (Epirrhoe alternata) a common species in Denmark. Here it is called: Almindelig Bladmåler.

June

Another moth here is the Common Roller (Ancylis badiana) This species is called: fladbælgvikler in Danish.

Meadow Brown (Maniola jurtina) is called: Græsrandøje in Danish.

Meadow Brown (Maniola jurtina) is a very common species of butterfly in Denmark.

Another common species here is the Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus). This butterfly is called: Engrandøje in Denmark.

The spots of the Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus) is more distinct on the back of the wings.

The Small Heath Butterfly (Coenonympha pamphilus) is called: Okkergul randøje in Danish.

The Small Heath (Coenonympha pamphilus) has a wingspan of only 35 mm.

Notice how hairy the Small Heath (Coenonympha pamphilus) is.

The front of the Lackey larva (Malacosoma neustria) looks like a large face. This is to scare of predators. This species is called: Ringspinder In Danish.

The Lackey moth (Malacosoma neustria) is a relatively rare species in Denmark. 

Rose Spiraea (Spiraea douglasii) is called: Rævehalespiræa in Danish. This is an invasive species from North America. But the impact on the invironment here is considered low.

The Blue Emperor (Anax imperator) is called: Stor kejserguldsmed in Danish. This species is very common here.

Another common dragonfly here is the Ruddy Darter (Sympetrum sanguineum). This species is called: Blodrød Hedelibel in Danish.

Ruddy Darter (Sympetrum sanguineum). These are females. The male is bright red.

The wingspan of the Ruddy Darter (Sympetrum sanguineum) is around 6 cm.

The Ruddy Darter (Sympetrum sanguineum) will spend a year as larvae under water before they reach the imago stage.

The Birds-foot Trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) is called: Almindelig kællingetand in Danish.

The Four-spotted Skimmer (Libellula quadrimaculata) is called: Fireplettet libel in Danish.

The Military Orchid (Orchis militaris) is called: Riddergøgeurt in Danish. The species is very rare in Denmark with only 2 observations in all of Denmark. One of them before 2011. 

Right now the only sure location of the Military Orchid (Orchis militaris) is here in Amager Fælled.

The is the caterpillar of the European Peacock Butterfly (Aglais io). This species is called: Dagpåfugleøje in Danish.

The Red Clover (Trifolium pratense) is very common here. This plant is called: Rødkløver in Denmark.

The Tufted Vetch (Vicia cracca) is called: Musevikke in Danish. This is a very common plant here. 

Speckled Bush-Cricket (Leptophyes punctatissima) is called: Krumknivgræshoppe in Danish. The sound of this cricket is barely audible to human ears with a frequency of 40 kHz.

Another common cricket here is the Short-winged Conehead (Conocephalus dorsalis). This species is called: Sivgræshoppe in Danish.

The Ladys Bedstraw (Galium verum) is called: Gul snerre in Danish. This is a very common species in this area.

The Mottled Thistle Fly (Xyphosia miliaria) is called: Tidsel-båndflue in Danish. This species is widespread in Denmark.

The Dotted Loosestrife (Lysimachia punctata) is called: Prikbladet fredløs in Danish.

The Western Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) is called: Honningbi in Danish. This species live in families of up to 80.000 individuals.

The Greater Musk-Mallow (Malva alcea) is called: Rosen-Katost in Danish. This plant species is relatively rare in Denmark with a little over 200 observations since 1979.

The Yellow Winged Parasitic Fly (Zophomyia temula) is called: Gulvinget Snylteflue in Danish.

The Yellow Winged Parasitic Fly (Zophomyia temula) is around 8 mm and is a common species here.

This is the flower of Sand Leek (Allium scorodoprasum). This common plant is called: Skovløg in Danish. The onion and plant is edible.

The Golden-bloomed Longhorn (Agapanthia villosoviridescens) is called: Tidselbuk in Denmark.

The bodylenght of the Golden-bloomed Longhorn (Agapanthia villosoviridescens) is around 2 cm.

The Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) is called: Rejnfan in Danish. This plant has yellow flowers.

Vespillo Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus vespillo) is called: Krumbenet ådselgraver in Danish.

Vespillo Burying Beetle (Nicrophorus vespillo) is common all over Denmark. But I have only seen this species in Amager Fælled.

The Common Yarrow (Achillea millefolium) is called: Almindelig røllike in Danish.

The Tree Bumble Bee (Bombus hypnorum) is common here.

The Tree Bumble Bee (Bombus hypnorum) can vary a lot in color intensity.

The Common Whitethroat (Sylvia communis) is called: Tornsanger in Danish.

The Common Blue Butterfly (Polyommatus icarus) is called: Almindelig blåfugl in Danish.

The Common Blue Butterfly (Polyommatus icarus) has a  wingspan of up to 36 millimetres.

The Common Redstart (Phoenicurus phoenicurus) is called: Rødstjert in Denmark. This species belong to the Old World flycatcher family (Muscicapidae).

The White Spot Iris Weevil (Mononychus punctumalbum) is called: Hvidplettet iris-snudebille in Danish. This species is considered rare in Denmark.

The White Spot Iris Weevil (Mononychus punctumalbum) is only observed a few places in Denmark and Amager Fælled is the first place this species was found in Denmark.

We only found the White Spot Iris Weevil (Mononychus punctumalbum) on the stem and in the flower of the Yellow Iris (Iris pseudacorus).

The Water Avens (Geum rivale) is called: Eng-Nellikerod in Danish.

The stems of Water Avens (Geum rivale) are very hairy and the roots smell like carnations.

The Emerald Spreadwing (Lestes dryas) is called: Sortmærket Kobbervandnymfe in Danish. This beautiful species is common here. Above is a male.

This is an Emerald Spreadwing (Lestes dryas) male too. But this one is younger. Notice the color difference in the eyes.

This is a young female Emerald Spreadwing (Lestes dryas).

The female Emerald Spreadwing (Lestes dryas) is carrying the eggs, which are quite big (and red), under the thorax.

The Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) is called: Stor Flagspætte in Danish.

This Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) is feeding the young.

While the adults of the Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) is searching for food this young woodpecker was looking at us.

This Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) was feeding the young larvae.

The nest of this Great Spotted Woodpecker (Dendrocopos major) was only about a meter from the ground.

The Black Orangeband Sawfly (Macrophya annulata) is called: Orangebåndet sort savflue in Danish. This species is common in this area.

This is a larvae of the Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis). This species is called: Harlekinmariehøne in Danish.

The pupa of the Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis).

The adult (Imago) of the Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis).

The adult Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis) seen from above. Remember the color pattern can vary a lot in this species.

The Reed Bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) is called: Rørspurv in Danish. This bird species is common in this area. 

The Tree Damsel Bug (Himacerus apterus) is called: Stor nymfetæge in Danish.

Pied Shield Bug (Tritomegas bicolor) is called: Spættet Tornben in Danish. This species is found mainly on plants belonging to the mint family (Lamiaceae).

The Black Banded Bee Fly (Hemipenthes morio) is called: Sort humleflue in Danish. This is a rare species in Denmark with less than 30 observations, but is found here in Amager Fælled.

I found this Black Banded Bee Fly (Hemipenthes morio) on stinging nettle. 

This specimen of Black Banded Bee Fly (Hemipenthes morio) sort humleflue was around 1 cm with a wingspan of around 1.5 cm.

The Spring Harvestman (Rilaena triangularis) is called: Forårsmejer in Denmark. Harvestmen are not spiders but belong to the class Arachnida like spiders. 

The Woolly-tailed Marsh Fly (Helophilus hybridus) is called: Hybrid-Sumpsvirreflue in Danish. 

The Tooth-thighed Hoverfly (Tropidia scita) is called: Køl-Svirreflue in Danish.

The Tooth-thighed Hoverfly (Tropidia scita) seems to be growing in numbers every year in this area.

The Tooth-thighed Hoverfly (Tropidia scita) seems to be common around the swampy areas.

The Hover Fly (Chrysotoxum bicinctum) imitate wasps to avoid being eaten. This species is called: Tobåndet Hvepsesvirreflue in Danish.

The Small Yellow-legged Robber Fly (Dioctria linearis) is called: Blegbenet Engrovflue in Danish.

The Small Yellow-legged Robber Fly (Dioctria linearis) is an assasin fly that catches other insects while in flight and feed on them.

The Broad Centurion Fly (Chloromyia formosa) is called: Grøn Våbenflue in Danish.

The Broad Centurion Fly (Chloromyia formosa) can reach 9 millimeters.

The Bumble Bee Hover Fly (Volucella bombylans) is called: Foranderlig Humlesvirreflue in Danish.

The Bumble Bee Hover Fly (Volucella bombylans) is one of the largest hover flies here with a wingspan of up to 14 mm.

A female mosquito (Ochlerotatus annulipes or Ochlerotatus flavescens). Even this annoying insect has its importing place in the eco system.

The Meadow Plant Bug (Leptopterna dolabrata) is called: Almindelig Græstæge in Danish. Above is a young specimen.

July

The Eurasian Skylark (Alauda arvensis) is called: Sanglærke in Danish. This bird species breeds in the open areas of Amager Fælled every year.

The nest of the Eurasian Skylark (Alauda arvensis) is directly on the ground and the bird is almost impossible to see with this perfect camouflage.

This is an adult Meadow Plant Bug (Leptopterna dolabrata).

The Meadow Plant Bug (Leptopterna dolabrata) is called: Almindelig Græstæge in Denmark. This insect feeds on developing grass seeds.

The Shaded Broad-Bar (Scotopteryx chenopodiata) is a common moth here. In Danish this insect is called: Almindelig Spidsvingemåler.

The caterpillar of the Shaded Broad-Bar (Scotopteryx chenopodiata) feeds mainly plants belonging to the bean family (Fabaceae).

The Yellow-haired Sun Fly (Myathropa florea) is called: Dødningehoved-Svirreflue in Denmark.

The Yellow-haired Sun Fly (Myathropa florea) is an important pollinator for many plants and it is very common here.

The Two-spotted Lady Beetle (Adalia bipunctata) is common in this area. This species is called: Toplettet Mariehøne in Danish. They feed on aphids and other small insects.

Another species here is the 22-Spot Ladybird (Psyllobora vigintiduopunctata). This lady beetle is called: Toogtyveplettet mariehøne in Danish.

The Asian Lady Beetle (Harmonia axyridis) is introduced and is not a native species but very common in Denmark.

Small Red-eyed Damselfly (Erythromma viridulum) is called: Lille Rødøjet Vandnymfe in Danish. This species is relatively common in Denmark.

 

The Pellucid Hover Fly (Volucella pellucens) is called: Hvidbåndet humlesvirreflue in Danish. This species is quite large. Usually around 15-16 mm in lenght. 

The Pellucid Hover Fly (Volucella pellucens) seem to prefer the flowers of teasels.

A young specimen of the European Earwig (Forficula auricularia). This insect is called: Almindelig Ørentvist in Denmark. This species is the only earwig native to Denmark.

The Wild Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) is called: Gærdekartebolle in Danish.

The seeds of the Wild Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) are an important winter food resource for some birds, notably the European goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis).

The flowers of the Wild Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) in early bloom.

The Wild Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) have spines all over the leaves and stem.

The Wild Teasel (Dipsacus fullonum) is an important hatchery for insects. The leaf sheath contain water after rain and small insects lay their eggs here after hatching their larvae develops in these pools. 

Two Birch Catkin Bug's (Kleidocerys resedae) mating. This species is common here. In Denmark this species is called: Birkefrøtæge.

The area of Amager Fælled is the only pristine nature within the capital of Denmark. The biodiversity here is amazing and this area should be preserved at all costs in my opinion.

The Green Shield Bug (Palomena prasina) is called: Grøn Bladtæge in Danish. This species lay green eggs in hexagonal batches of 25 to 30.

This is a young Green Shield Bug (Palomena prasina).

White-letter Hairstreak (Satyrium w-album) is called: Det hvide W in Danish. Notice the white W on the wings.

The Tree Bumble Bee (Bombus hypnorum) is called: Hushumle in Danish. This species is an important pollinator for many species including plum trees.

 

The Horseradish (Armoracia rusticana) is called: Peberrod in Danish. The root of this plant is edible and can be used in many dishes. It has a strong taste and can be used grated in salads, dips, soups, sauces etc. Horseradish contains more than twice the amount of vitamin C compared with oranges. 

The Pale Green Weevil (Polydrusus impressifrons) is called Grøn snudebille in Danish. This species is regarded as rare in Denmark. It is only found in two areas of the country and Amager Fælled is one of only 7 locations within these areas.

A similar but much more common species here is the Green Wevil (Phyllobius virideaeris). This species is also present in Amager Fælled.

I have observed at least one species of Nomad Bee (Nomada species) here, but I have not been able to get a proper photo yet and I can not identify this specific species.

The Common Green Colonel (Oplodontha viridula) is an important food item for the insectivorous birds here. This species is called: Grøn Våbenflue in Denmark.

The Chocolate-Tip (Clostera curtula) is a common moth here. This species is called: Lille Måneplet in Danish.

Up close you can see the Chocolate-Tip (Clostera curtula) has a firm grip on the grass straw. 

A young Canestrini's Harvestman (Opilio canestrinii). This species is called: Orange Vægmejer in Danish. Adult size is around 6-8 mm in body lenght. This specimen is around 3 mm.

The Rough-Haired Lagria Beetle (Lagria hirta) is called: Håret Skyggebille in Danish. This species feeds on nectar and pollen as adult (Imago). The larva feeds on fallen leaves.

The Rough-Haired Lagria Beetle (Lagria hirta) can grow to a size of 1 cm.

The False Black Widow (Steatoda grossa) is very rare and a relatively new species for the country. This species is called: Falsk enke in Danish. This might be Denmarks most venomous spider. 

The European Yellow Loosestrife Bee (Macropis europaea) is called: Hvidbenet Oliebi in Danish. This species is relatively rare i Denmark. With less than 100 observation since 2013.

The European Yellow Loosestrife Bee (Macropis europaea) is flying from June to September.

The common red-legged robberfly (Dioctria rufipes) is called: Rødbenet Engrovflue in Danish. This species can reach 15 mm.

The common red-legged robberfly (Dioctria rufipes) are predators and they seem to feed mainly feed on parasitic wasps. 

The Cricket-bat Orbweaver (Mangora acalypha) is called: Sortstribet Hedehjulspinder in Danish.

The female Cricket-bat Orbweaver (Mangora acalypha) seem to grow to around 6 mm.

A pair of Common Red Soldier Beetle's (Rhagonycha fulva) mating. This species is common here. It is called: Præstebille in Danish.

Another pair of Common Red Soldier Beetle (Rhagonycha fulva) mating.

These beetles are often found in Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa). Thisplant was introduced from South Europe back in The Middle Ages. This plant is called: Almindelig pastinak in Denmark.  

The root of the Wild Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) isedible.

The Point Striped Weevil (Liophloeus tessulatus) is called Punktstribet snudebille in Danish.

The Point Striped Weevil (Liophloeus tessulatus) is a cmmon species here. It can grow up to around 11 cm.

The Point Striped Weevil (Liophloeus tessulatus) is normally found in umbellifers like Ground Elder (Aegopodium podagraria).

The Marmalade Hover Fly (Episyrphus balteatus) is called: Dobbeltbåndet svirreflue in Danish.

Common Pill Woodlouse (Armadillidium vulgare) is called: Almindelig kuglebænkebider in Danish. This species is a crustacean.

Thin-legged Wolf Spiders (Pardosa sp.) are very common in this area. These species are called: Jagtedderkopper in Danish.

The Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) is called: Stor bredpande sommerfugl in Danish.

The Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) usually lays its eggs on the grass: Cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata) on Amager Fælled. The larva feeds on this plant as well. 

The Large Skipper (Ochlodes sylvanus) has a wingspan of up to 32 mm.

Red-tailed Bumble Bee (Bombus lapidarius) is called: Stenhumle in Danish. This species of bumble bee is very common in Denmark.

The Lesser Hornet Hoverfly (Volucella inanis) is called: Gul Humlesvirreflue in Danish. This species is rare in Denmark with less than 70 observations since 2006. But it can be found in this area.

The Dark Green Apple Capsid (Orthotylus marginalis) is called: Gulstribet Blomstertæge in Denmark. This species is often found on the wild apple trees in this area.

one of the Apple trees (Malus pumila) in the area.  

The Broad-bodied Chaser (Libellula depressa) is called: Blå Libel in Danish. This is a male.

This is a younger specimen of the Broad-bodied Chaser (Libellula depressa). This is also a male.

The Broad-leaved Sweet Pea (Lathyrus latifolius) is called: Flerårig fladbælg in Danish.

The Spined Mason Bee (Hoplosmia spinulosa) is called: Tornbi in Danish. This species is rare in Denmark. It is only found in 5 locations and Amager Fælled is one of them. This species was formerly known as Osmia spinulosa.

The Spined Mason Bee (Osmia spinulosa) in this area seem to prefer dandelions.

But I have also founf the Spined Mason Bee (Osmia spinulosa) on thistles. 

September

The Barn Funnel Weaver (Tegenaria domestica) is called: Lille husedderkop in Danish. This species is common among human settlements.

The female Barn Funnel Weaver (Tegenaria domestica) grow up to 10 mm and the male only around 6 mm. 

I found this Moor Frog (Rana arvalis) crossing one of the Southern main trails. This species is called: Spidssnudet Frø in Danish. This amphibian is protected by The European Environment Agencyś Habitat Directive. It is also protected by The Danish Environmental Protection Agency and the Bern Convention.

 

All observations in this article is confirmed in: Inaturalist

 

A special thanks to

Nikolai Filskov 

Linett

Nikolaj Kirk

Frederik Leck Fischer (Arachnida)

Peter Wiberg-Larsen (Nematocera)